A poem that depicts the importance of 'Ghatis'

Anwesha Ghosh
Thursday, 7 May 2020

“These migrants who have come to our State have played a vital role in its development. But however, they have always been sidelined and maltreated.”

Panaji: Taking cue from the ongoing hassle of migrants in country due to the coronavirus pandemic, Sangeeta Naik, an IT professional from Taleigao, has penned a poem named ‘Ghati’ – a slang usually used to define migrants labourers and posted a vidoe on it. It empathises with this important but neglected section of the society.

Naik, a Goan herself, said that she has always empathised with these migrant and upset about the fact how people treated them by humiliating using derogatory remarks. “For a long time I have been thinking of this issue on migrants and how they are treated as outsiders. My poem on the same defines how these sect of people have been oppressed and looked down upon in the society.”

Exuding that there is a lot of contribution of these ‘ghatis’ in laying the foundation stone of every building in the State, Naik said, “These migrants who have come to our State have played a vital role in its development. But however, they have always been sidelined and maltreated.”

“Through my poem I want to convey the message of the importance and need of these migrants, ‘ghatis’ as they are referred to, who are here not only for their own personal earnings but also for the State’s well being,” she added.

She further opines that there should be no discrimination between residents and migrants, as these people who come from outside for work purpose consider it as their own homeland and love it in the same way. “We are entering the phase of global village where all stay as one without considering them outsiders. Anticipating that migrants want to enter the local fabric and destroy it is absolutely wrong. Everyone has to be incorporated and made a part of our society. And this what I have specified in my poem.”

The poem has been written and narrated by Naik in Konkani and transcribed in three different scripts - Nagri, Romi and Kannada and can be found on this link: https://bit.ly/35A9rgW.

Last few lines of the poem in English:

One day, just one day…

You please fit your legs in my shoes

and experience the agony

of the flowing serosanguineous wounds of humiliation

& if you would still would prefer to humiliate me

by using the same word ‘Ghati’ then please go ahead and do it

I on my part, will conclude that your heart is a mere stone.

After that, you can just go on shouting, Ghati, Ghati, Ghati…

I will not look back, I will not turn back … I will never ever return back.

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